Tag: eighteenth century

Deliberative Friendship in the 1790s

The opening stages of the French Revolution helped generate widespread enthusiasm for reform in Britain.  It did so especially amongst a group of intellectual and literary women and men who contributed to the emerging ‘revolution controversy’ in pamphlets, poetry and novels and were bonded together by acquaintance and friendship in an increasingly febrile political atmosphere.

Murder in Cardigan: Sex Work, Social Reputation and Women’s Agency in Eighteenth-Century Wales

Complicated and often conflicted responses to sex workers who become victims of violence is by no means new, and is not limited to police and the courts. If we look at evidence from earlier centuries it is clear that both social and legal responses often had little to do with the legality of sex work, and far more to do with attitudes towards women’s sexual reputations.